Jay 發問時間: 社會與文化語言 · 7 年前

英語聯繫動詞 vs 人稱代詞

在正式文法中"When pronouns follow linking verbs, traditionalists use subject case"是確立的規則,就像我們說"it is I"而不是"it is me"。那麼,請問以下兩個例句哪一個是對的呢(請注意,我問的是正式文法,請不要告訴我這是old-fashioned或是口語不這樣說)?

1) Shouldn't it be fairer for THEY to get the cold beverage together?

2) Shouldn't it be fairer for THEM to get the cold beverage together?

1) It would probably be fairer for SHE and her friend to get the cold beverage together.

2) It would probably be fairer for HER and her friend to take the cold beverage together.

已更新項目:

再請教,是

1)"Please lunch with our guests and I." or"Please lunch with our guests and me."

2)"It is I you are looking for."or "It is me you are look for."

2 個已更新項目:

Well, the fact is, I am also a learner of Latin, Greek and Sanskrit, these language do have concise rules to follow, and most of the modern languages are derived from these three, and it sometimes raises questions about the root of the language itself.

3 個已更新項目:

I must confess I'm started to lose the senses of English. Oh, and pardon me, I'm out of my limits today.

4 個已更新項目:

Believe it or not, I'd come up with the literary usage like"I'm not afflicted with false modesty…"

Anyway, thanks you both for answering my "stupid" question.

5 個已更新項目:

Corrections: "languages" for the second and" thank" for the fourth sentence above……

3 個解答

評分
  • 7 年前
    最佳解答

    When pronouns follow linking verbs

    當代名詞接在連綴動詞之後

    這很明確說 「代名詞接在連綴動詞之後」, It is I, I 直接跟著 is,這是符合規則的例句。

    但 Shouldn't it be fairer for 「代名詞」 to.... 的代名詞已經不在 be 之後,而是在介係詞 for 之後。 介係詞後面加它的受詞,當然要用受格。 所以:

    1) Shouldn't it be fairer for THEY to get the cold beverage together? (X)

    2) Shouldn't it be fairer for THEM to get the cold beverage together? (O)

    1) It would probably be fairer for SHE and her friend to get the cold beverage together. (X)

    2) It would probably be fairer for HER and her friend to take the cold beverage together. (O)

    2013-08-01 09:26:40 補充:

    Please lunch with our guests and me.

    our guests and me 是介係詞 with 的受詞,所以要用 me。

    It is I you are looking for.

    = It is I whom you are looking for.

    這裡按你強調的規則要用 I。 It is I. You are looking for me. 兩句合成一句,用關係代名詞受格 whom 來取代第二句的 me,然後關係代名詞受格可以省略,就是你的句子。

    2013-08-01 12:09:54 補充:

    I am curious. Who's this teacher of yours? It seems this guy is pretty orthodox.

    English is a living language. The way he/she taught you to write basically kills the liveliness of English. It sounds like a dialogue on a stage when you say "It is I for whom you are looking."

    2013-08-01 12:12:30 補充:

    Check this out concerning the myth of "No preposition at the end of a sentence":

    http://oxforddictionaries.com/words/ending-sentenc...

    2013-08-01 12:27:46 補充:

    I am curious because Jay writes so well. If he can write in English as well as he does, he shouldn't have asked the question in the first place.

    2013-08-01 13:19:50 補充:

    Good discussion indeed, my friend. Thank you for your involvement.

  • 7 年前

    And the opinions contradicted themselves again, this is actually the main reason I get mixed up!!!

    2013-08-01 11:25:59 補充:

    As I know, prepositions should be followed by Accusative case(at least in English), so the best rewrite should be "It is I for whom you are looking."(No prepositions at the end of a sentence).

    2013-08-01 11:28:40 補充:

    Nevertheless, "whom" does not appear colloquialism and could be left out, grammatically, so which word on earth take the object?

    2013-08-01 11:30:17 補充:

    Ps. this is actually a research from my school, not even my teacher can tell how this works

    2013-08-01 11:35:18 補充:

    Ok, this is diverting, I understand what you mean, and I don't really care about grammar rules, but as I said this is a research, so I really need to figure out the correct usage.

    2013-08-01 11:46:16 補充:

    Ah, well, I didn't really expect you to be patient enough to discuss with me so far, since this doesn't do you anything good, so…thanks ever so much!

    2013-08-01 11:49:18 補充:

    As for the last issue, well, the spurious rule about not ending sentences with prepositions is a remnant of Latin grammar, in which a preposition was the one word that a writer could not end a sentence with.

    2013-08-01 11:51:08 補充:

    And my teacher always told me "Never end a sentence with a preposition.", whilst I myself consider Latin grammar should never straightjacket English grammar.

    2013-08-01 11:58:27 補充:

    You see I totally agree with this, "If the superstition is a "rule" at all, it is a rule of rhetoric and not of grammar, the idea being to end sentences with strong words that drive a point home."

    2013-08-01 12:38:58 補充:

    Believe me, he is antediluvian. Sure I do know how to use languages effectively, that was what I have been trying to explain.

  • 7 年前

    You have two different issues that get mixed up:

    1. A linking verb can be followed with subject (like "It is I", formal grammar) or object as subject complement (Iike "it is me", colloquial).

    2013-08-01 01:59:09 補充:

    2. always use an object when is followed after a preposition.

    It is me you are looking for.

    "for" need an object, so you cannot use "I", but "me".

    2013-08-01 11:24:55 補充:

    If you want to write it, then you write it as:

    It is I whom you are looking for.

    However, in daily conversation, you can simplify it as:

    it is me you are looking for.

    2013-08-01 11:27:44 補充:

    Language is for communication and expression. As long as you can get your idea across, then you use it right, even though it might not agree with grammar rules.

    For example, when you go buy a car for $25456 at the dealer.

    2013-08-01 11:30:22 補充:

    Likely you will hear: twenty-five four fifty-six

    Seldom, you will hear: twenty-five thousand four hundred fifty-six.

    In a phone conversation:

    2013-08-01 11:33:02 補充:

    A: May I speak with Mr. Ma

    B: Speaking, or This is he.

    Is "speaking" better or "this is he"?

    or you want to say, "This is he who is speaking"?

    2013-08-01 11:41:22 補充:

    If this a research, then master LionEnglish's saying is for what shall be written, the formal way. Once you start moving word around, as long as it doesn't violate the grammar rule, then it is what you can use.

    2013-08-01 11:45:36 補充:

    There is NO such a grammatical rule that you cannot place preposition at the end of sentence, for example:

    The dress had not even been paid for.

    The match was rained off.

    What did you put that there for?

    2013-08-01 11:46:55 補充:

    By the way, you cannot say:

    For what did you put that there?

    do you know why ?

    2013-08-01 11:53:15 補充:

    If your teacher says so, then ash her or him to move the prepositions of that 3 sentences I used as examples.

    2013-08-01 11:53:34 補充:

    ash ==> ask

    2013-08-01 12:21:15 補充:

    Master LionEnglish! Look like we have referred to the same link about ending with preposition. Hopefully, poster KNOWS why one cannot use "For what did you put that there?"

    2013-08-01 12:58:39 補充:

    Yes, as a student, with this kind of writing ability, especially, Jay can use those difficult words is really impressive. As an old fart, I really applaud you young stud's achievement.

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